Skip to content

You are here:Home arrow Nutrition arrow Vitamins and Supplements arrow All About Selenium
All About Selenium E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Selenium is a trace mineral that is essential to good health but required only in small amounts. Selenium is incorporated into proteins to make selenoproteins, which are important antioxidant enzymes. The antioxidant properties of selenoproteins help prevent cellular damage from free radicals. Free radicals are natural by-products of oxygen metabolism that may contribute to the development of chronic diseases such as cancer and heart disease. Other selenoproteins help regulate thyroid function and play a role in the immune system.

 

Foods that Provide Selenium

Plant foods are the major dietary sources of selenium in most countries throughout the world. The content of selenium in food depends on the selenium content of the soil where plants are grown or animals are raised. Selenium also can be found in some meats and seafood. Animals that eat grains or plants that were grown in selenium-rich soil have higher levels of selenium in their muscle. In the U.S., meats and bread are common sources of dietary selenium. Some nuts are also sources of selenium.

Selenium content of foods can vary. For example, Brazil nuts may contain as much as 544 micrograms of selenium per ounce. They also may contain far less selenium. It is wise to eat Brazil nuts only occasionally because of their unusually high intake of selenium. Selected food sources of selenium include:

FoodMicrograms
(μg)
Percent
DV*
Brazil nuts, dried, unblanched, 1 ounce 544 780
Tuna, light, canned in oil, drained, 3 ounces 63 95
Beef, cooked, 3½ ounces 35 50
Spaghetti w/ meat sauce, frozen entrée, 1 serving 34 50
Cod, cooked, 3 ounces 32 45
Turkey, light meat, roasted, 3½ ounces 32 45
Beef chuck roast, lean only, roasted, 3 ounces 23 35
Chicken Breast, meat only, roasted, 3½ ounces 20 30
Noodles, enriched, boiled, 1/2 cup 17 25
Macaroni, elbow, enriched, boiled, 1/2 cup 15 20
Egg, whole, 1 medium 14 20
Cottage cheese, low fat 2%, 1/2 cup 12 15
Oatmeal, instant, fortified, cooked, 1 cup 12 15
Rice, white, enriched, long grain, cooked, 1/2 cup 12 15
Rice, brown, long-grained, cooked, 1/2 cup 10 15
Bread, enriched, whole wheat, commercially prepared, 1 slice 10 15
Walnuts, black, dried, 1 ounce 5 8
Bread, enriched, white, commercially prepared, 1 slice 4 6
Cheddar cheese, 1 ounce 4 6

*DV = Daily Value. DVs are reference numbers developed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to help consumers determine if a food contains a lot or a little of a specific nutrient. The DV for selenium is 70 micrograms (ug). Most food labels do not list a food's selenium content. The percent DV (%DV) listed on the table indicates the percentage of the DV provided in one serving. A food providing 5% of the DV or less is a low source while a food that provides 10-19% of the DV is a good source. A food that provides 20% or more of the DV is high in that nutrient. It is important to remember that foods that provide lower percentages of the DV also contribute to a healthful diet. For foods not listed in this table, please refer to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Nutrient Database Web site: http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/cgi-bin/nut_search.pl.

 

Selenium Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA)

The RDA recommends the average daily dietary intake level that is sufficient to meet the nutrient requirements of nearly all (97-98%) healthy individuals in each age and gender group.

Selenium Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) for 

Age
(years)
Males and Females
(μg/day)
Pregnancy
(μg/day)
Lactation
(μg/day)
1-3 y 20 N/A N/A
4-8 y 30 N/A N/A
9-13 y 40 N/A N/A
14-18 y 55 60 70
19 y + 55 60 70

Selenium Deficiency

Human selenium deficiency is rare in the U.S. but is seen in other countries, most notably China, where soil concentration of selenium is low. There is evidence that selenium deficiency may contribute to development of a form of heart disease, hypothyroidism, and a weakened immune system. There is also evidence that selenium deficiency does not usually cause illness by itself. Rather, it can make the body more susceptible to illnesses caused by other nutritional, biochemical or infectious stresses.

 
< Prev   Next >

 Contact Our News Editors

  • For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.
  • Please send any medical, health, fitness or anti-aging news press releases to: This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it  
  Back to Front Page
 List of all Health and Medical Sections

MMF RSS Feeds

Partners

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
 

Sponsors

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

A to Z Health:
Allergies | Alzheimers | Anxiety | Arthritis | Asthma | Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) | Autism | Auto-Immune Disorders | Bird Flu | Bladder Cancer | Bone Disease | Brain Tumor Breast Cancer | Cardiovascular Disease | Cervical Cancer | Cholesterol (HDL, LDL) | Chronic Fatigue Syndrome | Cold and Flu | Colitis | Colon Cancer | Colorectal Cancer | Crohn's Disease Cystic Fibrosis | Dementia | Depression | Diabetes | Eczema | Endometrial Cancer | Erectile Dysfunction | Esophageal Cancer | Eye Disease | Fibromyalgia | Gastrointestinal Problems | Hair Loss Headaches (e.g., migraines, sinus, etc.) | Head and Neck | Hearing Loss | Heartburn | Heart Disease | Hormone Disorders | Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) | Infectious Diseases | Joint Pain Kidney Cancer | Kidney Disease | Leukemia | Liver Cancer | Liver Disease | Lung Cancer | Lung Disease | Lymphoma | Melanoma | Mesothelioma | Migraines | Multiple Sclerosis | Obesity Obessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) | Osteoporosis | Ovarian Cancer | Pancreatic Cancer | Parkinson’s Disease | Pediatric Cancer | Prostate Cancer | Prostate Health | Psoriasis | Respiratory Ailments | Sarcoma | Skin Cancer | Skin Diseases & Conditions | Sleep Disorders | Stomach Cancer | Stress | Stroke | Testicular Cancer | Thyroid Cancer | Thyroid Disease | Urology/Renal

Visitors: 13855545
Copyright © 2007 - 2014 Muscle Mag Fitness | Muscle, Fitness and Health Resource All rights reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of Muscle Mag Fitness terms of service.
Designed by: HostAfric.com